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20130103
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. exploration and production companies and energy that have done well and need capital. you can raise it or you can join forces with somebody else. very often the decision is to merge and not raise capital and take that risk. >> susie: and in tech what should they look for. tech is such a huge area we have a few seconds left what are your thoughts? >> look at the base companiesan. the kind of service that's county of victoria to their -- o their base line services. >> thanks bob, have a greatweek. bob pr profusek. >> susie: the price of gold fell slightly today, as the fiscal cliff drama in washington continues to weigh on markets and confidence. gold slipped almost $8 to $1,655. for the year, gold is up about 5%, half the gain in the s&p 500. but as erika miller reports, some gold bugs believe next year will be far better for the precious metal. >> reporter: if you got gold jewelry as a holiday gift, it may be more than something beautiful to wear. it may also prove to be a shining investment. some gold traders think the yellow metal could hit $2,000 an ounce next year. the reason? >> monetary
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
be across the board for everybody and, in the energy area, if take really come down hard on fracking which has been a very important asset for our country. >> all right, sorry we have to leave it there. an interesting conversation. thank you very much wane. best wishes for the new your. wayne kaufman of john thomas financial. thanks a lot >> susie: the fiscal cliff isn't the only drama playing out for the u.s. economy: there's also the "container cliff". 14 ports along the u.s. east and gulf coasts are at risk of closing if longshoremen and the international maritime alliance cannot reach a deal by saturday. federal mediators have been called in to help with last minute negotiations. at the heart of the dispute: container royalties. those fees charged to shippers were implemented in the 1960s to help dock workers displaced by technology. the maritime alliance wants the royalties capped. earlier this month a port strike in southern california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming
saw gains of at least 2% in technology, energy and materials related stocks. financials were the strongest group this year, rising over 26%. consumer discretionary stocks advanced over 20% as well. while the defensive health care group added 15%. those banking shares got an added boost today on word that banks could soon reach a $10 billion settlement with u.s. regulators over foreclosure abuses. the biggest winner on word of a potential settlement, bank of america. its shares added a quarter, to $11.60. it was the biggest winner on the dow this year. some positive analyst comments on facebook sent shares higher. b.m.o. capital says it's doubling its price target to $32 a share. it says facebook may benefit from a pick up in ad spending. facebook added $0.70 to $26.60. it looks like apple's mini ipad is a big hit in china. apple's stores both on the mainland and in hong kong are reportedly either out of stock or have tight supplies. apple climbed nearly 4.5% to close at $532. some big changes over the weekend at zynga. the online game maker slashed 11 games from its library a
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
thing, you can channel something. you can channel an energy that sometimes is only stirred up by some material or some story that you are exposed to, and it's that process of actually walking in those shoes. you read a good book, it changes your life. now imagine going out and living it. it's like -- and the idea as well that i love that responsibility. i love being part of a group that really loves something together. you've got something to hold up. it's a good pressure. tavis: so "twilight," as you know, is out, and as i said again, breaking records everywhere. but life goes on for kristen stewart, and the new project is called "on the road," and you might want to check it out. first in l.a. and new york, and then wide release. >> yup. tavis: i'm honored to have you here. i enjoyed this immensely. >> oh, yeah, me too, thanks. tavis: thanks for coming on. you good? >> yeah, i'm good. are you good? tavis: you're good. yeah, no. >> all right, sweet. tavis: so we're both good. >> [laughter] yeah. tavis: good. that's good. [laughter] thanks for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> sh
basically take photons and hit a sensor that would turn the photon impulses, the energy of the photons, instead of hitting film, would hit a sensor, and instead of a chemical reaction happening, you would basically get ones and zeros you'd get a value for a color, red, green, or blue. so we're just kind of talking about here's some light, we've got some film, and we just process it and then we'd project it and we'd watch a movie. now we're talking about sunlight hitting a sensor and going to ones and zeros into a box, and we take that box and then we project that, and now we're watching a movie. tavis: so another one of these technological advances. >> yes. tavis: you paused when you said yes, and i want to dig into that. i ask is it really a technological advance. obviously, it could be argued in some ways that it is advancing us. but is it causing challenges in other ways? >> well, it's an industry shift, so practically, it's like what is the role of the cinematographer in making a movie now? he used to be in control of the image. he was the magician. he knew how to do just dealing
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7